In 2004 the “Mamingwey” name, stemming from an aboriginal legend, was feasted as a gift of hope, transforming a community of burn survivors, family members, friends, caregivers and firefighters into a Burn Survivor Society.

MAMINGWEY is an Ojibwey term for butterfly.  It refers to our journey through life’s cycle of transformation with its fragility and its strength.  Monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles from Canada’s north to the mountains of Mexico.  This is a reflection of strength and fragility co-existing.

The Butterfly’s Lesson reminds us that we must endure the struggle before we gain strength.  When man denied the butterfly its struggle, he remained weak and frail.  By overcoming obstacles, one learns the skills and gains the confidence needed to survivor and thrive.

The MAMINGWEY logo is based upon the medicine wheel teaching and is divided into four quadrants.  Each quadrant represents the pillars of our survival and evolution as beings.

In the infancy or physical stage, the egg represents a new beginning.  A burn injury causes physical alteration, pain and suffering and often a feeling or helplessness and dependency on others. 

The emotional stage (larva) is the period of establishing one’s identity, learning about one’s emotions and learning how to control those emotions. It refers to what we put into our heads, our “inner talk”. 

The adult or mental (cocoon) stage is that of wisdom, morals and kindness.

The butterfly, in its adult transformation is in search or spirituality, that of a Higher Power, God, Creator or whatever creates a sense of empowerment.

The fire in the middle with the smoke rising symbolizes ones connection with the Higher Power.  One must continually feed their spirit and by looking after each quadrant, everything comes into balance